Idaho Power of Attorney Forms

For over 20 years U.S. Legal Forms, Inc. has provided Idaho Power of Attorney Forms online. Free Previews. Special: Choose our Idaho Personal Planning Package and receive your Power of Attorney, Living Will, Last Will and more. Planning POA Package

Power of Attorney for Idaho

A power of attorney allows an agent to act on your behalf based on the terms of the document, whether a General Power of Attorney, Limited Power of Attorney, Child Care Power of Attorney or others.

Idaho Power of Attorney Act

A power of attorney (POA) is the legal document that allows you to delegate your personal and/or business matters to another, called your agent, attorney-in-fact, or personal representative. You are referred to as the principal or grantor. The Idaho Statutes contain laws governing a power of attorney form and requirements for its validity. Some of the key provisions you should know are examined below:

A durable power of attorney form is presumed under Idaho law. A durable form is one that won’t be cancelled if you become physically or mentally incapacitated after signing it. In Idaho, if you don’t state that you want the form to be terminated by your future incapacity, it will stay in effect if you later become incapacitated. Idaho Statutes Section 15-12-104

You must sign the form. If you’re physically unable to sign it, you may ask another person to sign your name in front of you. It’s recommended to sign it in front of a notary public and have it notarized. That way, if there’s ever a challenge to the authenticity of your signature, the law will presume it’s genuine, and the challenging party will have the burden of proving it’s not. Idaho Statutes Section 15-12-105

The form takes effect when you sign it. However, you can create what’s called a springing power of attorney by including terms stating that it is only to take effect at a later date, or upon the occurrence of a specified event. For example, you may want it to take effect only upon your future incapacity. Idaho Statutes Section 15-12-109

You can name co-agents and successor agents. Co-agents share authority at the same time, while successor agents have authority only after a previous agent’s authority has been terminated. Co-agents will be presumed to have independent authority to act, unless you specify that they must act together and agree on decisions. By naming one or more successor agents, you can avoid the termination of the power of attorney when your original agent can no longer serve due to death, incapacity, resignation, removal, or other reason. Idaho Statutes Section 15-12-111

You can revoke your power of attorney form at any time. In some instances, it will be automatically terminated, such as when you include terms for termination in the form, when its primary purpose has been accomplished, when you become incapacitated (nondurable POAs only), or at your death. The agent’s authority will also terminate at his/her death, resignation, incapacity, or filing of a dissolution or annulment of marriage to you. If you revoke the agent’s authority, a notice of revocation should be given to the agent and those that he or she dealt with as your agent. Idaho Statutes Section 15-12-110

General Power of Attorney

Q: What is a General Power of Attorney

A General Power of Attorney is a legal document which gives the person you choose (the agent) the power to manage your assets and financial affairs while you are alive. The document must be signed by you (the principal) while you have the required legal capacity to give your agent clear and concise instructions. The appointment may be for a fixed period and can be revoked by you at any time providing you still have the legal capacity to do so. A power of attorney ceases when you die. The executor named in your will then takes over the responsibilities of your estate.

Living Will and Health Care Power of Attorney

Q: What is a Living Will and Health Care Power of Attorney?

A: A Health Care Power of Attorney is a legal document that allows an individual to designate another person to make medical decisions for him or her when he or she cannot make decisions for himself or herself. In other words it names someone who stands in your shoes and tells the doctors what to do or what not do for you.

A Living Will is a document that allows a person to explain in writing which medical treatment he or she does or does not want during a terminal illness. A terminal illness is a fatal illness that leads ultimately to death. A Living Will takes effect only when the patient is incapacitated and can no longer express his or her wishes. The will states which medical treatments may be used and which may not be used to die naturally and without the patientís life being artificially prolonged by various medical procedures. Although the term Living Will may indicate that it is a Will, in reality, it is more similar to a Power of Attorney than a Will.

Limited or Special Power of Attorney?

Q: What is a limited or special power of attorney?

A: A Limited power of attorney is one which is limited to a specific act or particular purpose. It is also referred to as special power of attorney. A limited power of attorney allows the Principal to give only specific powers to the agent.

Related Packages

Life Documents Planning Package

Life Documents Planning Package


The documents in this package includes a Will, Living Will, Power Of Attorney and other Forms.
Best Value


Gold Award 2006-2018

BEST Legal Forms Company

11 Year Winner in all Categories:
Forms, Features, Customer Service
and Ease of Use.


U.S. Legal Forms, Inc. BBB Business Review


U.S. Legal Forms, Inc. BBB Business Review