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Virginia Accident Forms

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Auto Accident FAQ

What is auto accident law?  The law permits you to seek recovery after an accident to "make you whole again." The main concept is that you should be compensated in a manner that, as best as the law can arrange, places you back in the same position as you were before the accident. In attempting to make a person whole, the law recognizes that damages from an automobile accident can come in many forms; lost wages, medical expenses, pain and suffering, scarring, disfigurement, loss of earning capacity and a spouse's loss of consortium, or loss of the services, society and intimacy of the relationship.

Who can be held liable for an auto accident?  Every driver has the duty to keep his car under proper control and to drive in a manner so that he may avoid colliding with other cars. Most of the time the fault of the accident lies with the driver involved. However, there are circumstances when others may be negligent and liable for the harm caused. These parties include, but are not limited to, the state or municipality which maintains roads, bridges and signs; auto manufacturers; and maintenance and repair shops.

What should I do if I'm involved in an auto accident?  Individuals should never leave the scene of the accident. They should avoid statements of apology or admissions of fault: there may be other factors involved that they are not aware of. They need to render assistance to any injured persons, but not to attempt to move them. They should not move their vehicle unless the accident is minor. They should attempt to secure the names and telephone numbers of witnesses, even though they believe they are at fault. They must always be truthful to their insurance company. Misrepresentations may result in cancellation of a policy for insurance and expose them to even more liability. Some states require that a police officer always be called to the scene; other states require police involvement only in circumstances of declared injury. Generally, a police officer cannot issue a citation if he or she did not witness the accident, unless it is clear that the accident could only have been caused by one driver. Notwithstanding, others drivers may have contributed to the accident, even if they did not receive citations.  


Workplace Accident FAQ

What is workplace accident law?  Workplace accident injuries are those injuries that arise out of and in the course of gainful employment. Generally, injuries received while not at work are not covered. However, if workers sustain injuries during an event or occasion that was sponsored by the company they are working, such injuries will be covered generally. Excluded are work injuries to private household workers and home injuries..

What laws govern workplace safety?  The primary law governing workplace safety are administered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). OSHA aims to ensure worker safety and health in the United States by working with employers and employees to create better working environments. Workplace inspections are one of OSHA's principal activities. OSHA enforces workplace safety standards, and reaches out to employers and employees through technical assistance and consultation programs. In 2002, occupational injury and illness rates were 5.3 cases per 100 workers, with 4.7 million injuries and illnesses among private sector firms. Work-related injuries and illnesses in the manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade, and services sectors accounted for about 78 percent of this 4.7 million. States also have enacted laws to regulate workplace safety. State laws vary, so local laws should be consulted to determine the standards in your workplace.


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